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20121201
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. karl rove would be impressed. most said the political elites only one-third owned slaves and most did not own any bets the deep south was confident they could do this and that they could pull it off. they had no trouble lining each other but it was a white man democracy. they had to sell its. they were not all confident. with paramilitary violence and intimidation. they called the convention by lunchtime on the first day unanimous. but what preceded that if you're in a meeting everything is unanimous don't you get suspicious? i do. other places it showed. in alabama the representatives charge they were run added of the union the they were being violated. that no ordinary farmer. the elites has run us out. it is very revealing of what democracy has been. they often and made the case what they really wanted was a republic. they did not like the way of politics but they had to play the game but they strongarm it ran through and to then the normal democratic process none of those seceded intel for sumpter was fired upon. even then there were four states that seceded it was incredibly cont
campaign in history. karl rove would have been impressed. they needed -- i mean, most of the political elite, only a third of the white adult male house owned slaves and most of them didn't own very many said the political elite that was orchestrating this especially they were extremely confident that they could do this and they believed that they would be able to pull that off and they didn't have any trouble lining each other but the challenge for them is that this was theoretically a white man's democracy. every white man got to vote. there were no property qualifications left. so they had to do this by electrical means. they had to win an election and they were not at all confident about that coming into was an incredible amount of violence and intimidation that went into it and the results are very uneven. they call a convention and voted up secession by lunchtime on the first day completely unanimously that's how they went out of the union. but what had preceded that? when you are in a meeting and everything is unanimous don't you get a little suspicious? why do. and there was a
. [laughter] so i know, i know karl rove wants to think he invented all of this, but -- [laughter] we've been, we've been fighting these battles for a long time. so jefferson himself saw that we were always going to be divided. he said that men have divided themselves over the opinions of whether the interests of the many or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my family in the peace and respite of possibility cello. well, you know, the road was open. he could have gone. new york, philadelphia, williamsburg, richmond, paris, london, hold and, i mean, he was everywhere th
of a bitch. [laughter] so, i know karl rove wants to think that he invented all of this but we have been fighting these battles for a long time. so, jefferson himself saw that we were all going to be divided. she said men have divided themselves over the opinions of whether the interest of the many were of the nobles should govern the affairs of men. she was looking back to greece and rome and the founding to figure out to figure out how much of the divided opinion as natural, how much is on natural and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have in his answer was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations. we all know them. if i could only be with my books and my farm and my family and at peace and rest of monticello. well, you know the road was open, she could have gone in new york, philadelphia, richmond, paris, london, holland. he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it because it has a young man he entered into what he called the board election between submission and the sword. the american revoluti
and iraq, the bush white house, the administration was very aggressive, particularly karl rove is not a shy person. carl did not hesitate to let us know if they upset with something we're doing. but it would, i didn't blame him for this. he was doing his job. he was an advocate. he was a very effective advocate and he took issue with a number things we did and we respond as best we could. >> you mention a couple of abc correspondents and an anchor. let me start with sam donaldson. what is sam like? >> san is exactly what you see on the air. just exactly. he's wonderfully irrepressible. he can't help being sam donaldson. [laughter] he does it at home. he does in time you run into them. he's so energetic. he's so passionate. he loves th the news. hilos washington particularly. loves politics. knows it backwards and forwards. is wonderful but sometimes he gets in his own way. by the way, one of the things i did is i push sand also back in the white house. even the white house correspondent for reagan, and when i went and i was not comfortable the way we were covering the clinton white house an
. another obligation was to meet and turn the public which made him into a roving commercial advertisement, particularly for canadian pacific railway. a book near reading journey appeared the following year. hard to tell how much of it is his own prose. his comment on meeting the press in london, reporters were awfully with the end we have a lot of fun together, hands that the newsroom pros back in copenhagen and give him a final shape. but for the 44 days he went round the world, he was the star of the show. the premise of the journey was that a circumnavigation was the ultimate adventure, a good, but not dangerous test of character. that emphasis was reinforced by the reid introduction to the english translation which was written by graham stating around the world, everyone of us has made the voyage many times in our imaginations. the introduction made at this point typical not to magellan, the great pioneer of the whole thing. it threw in francis drake for good measure, but in its fast board to jules verne his posthumous of reputation was beginning his to send. his stories were challeng
a report at each of his stops. another obligation was to -- the public which made him into a roving commercial advertisement particulaparticula rly for canadian pacific railway. a book appeared in the following year. it's hard to tell how much of it is his own prose. his comment on meeting the press in london says ,-com,-com ma reporters were awfully witty and had a lot of fun together. hence the newsroom pros back in copenhagen had given the stories final shape. but for the 44 days he went around the world, holt was the star of the show. the premise of the journey was that of circumnavigation was the ultimate boy's adventure of good but not dangerous attempt. the emphasis is reinforced by the introduction of english transition which was written by a grown-up, stating around the world everyone of us has made the voyage many times in our imagination. the introduction made at this point typical magellan is a great pioneer of the whole thing, but then fast-forwarded. whose posthumous reputation was beginning its descent to that of children's author. the stories were challenging yet fac
and charm the public, which made it into a roving commercial advertisement, particularly for canadian pacific railway. a book appeared in the following year. it's hard to tell how much of it is his own prose. is comment on meeting the press in london said reporters were awfully witty, and we have a lot of fun together. the newsroom pros back in copenhagen had given historic the final shape. but for the 44 days he went around the world, he was the star of the show. the premise of the journey was circumnavigation was the ultimate boys adventure, good but not dangers test of his character. that emphasis is reinforce by the english translation of his book which was written by a grown-up. skating around the world, everyone of us has made the voyage many times in our imagination. the introduction at this point typical nod to ferdinand magellan, the great pioneer of the whole thing. it through in francis drake for good money but then it fast forwarded to jules burns whose posthumous record his was beginning its descent to that of children's author. his stories for challenging him much as cir
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8